Our Manufacturers

Where is it made?

We spent months looking for the perfect manufacturer for each and every piece in our line, and are proud to say that we have partnered with some of the most talented makers and craftsmen in the industry. If you have any questions about our manufacturers, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Pennsylvania

All of our wooden pieces are made in Pennsylvania at a family-owned and operated woodworking factory. Here, all of the materials are carefully sourced domestically, as to not contribute to deforestation. A CNC-router is used to cut materials down in the most efficient way and reduce waste. Then skilled craftsmen assemble and finish each piece, marrying the precision of modern technology with the skill and attention to detail that can only be achieved by hand.

New York

We are always making something new in our studio. We started out with the Captain’s Tray and then branched out into the Zelda tables. We make several custom Zelda’s every month, which keeps us busy and also allows us to keep improving our processes and experiment with new sizes. We got so many orders for custom round Zelda tables that we added them to our regular line. All of the marble pieces in our line are made in our studio with slabs sourced from a vendor right here in Brooklyn.

In spring 2015, we are adding several new pieces that our friend David makes in his metal shop near Brooklyn’s beautiful Prospect Park.

New Jersey

Our soft, recycled cotton blankets come from a small manufacturer in New Jersey. Their studio is committed to sustainability from the way the fibers are up-cycled to the dyeing process of the yarn.

Maryland

We keep a small metalshop in Baltimore very busy with the production of our brass hairpin legs for our Zelda tables. Coming in spring 2015, the Zelda console table will also have legs from this maker.

Texas

Katy’s dad makes the Shipshape soap holder in his woodshop in Corpus Christi, Texas. It is made from wood that was reclaimed from the handrail of the US Naval Ship Simon Bolivar Buckner. The ship was retired from the Navy in 1990, and sold for scrapping in 1997. Craig Skelton, salvaged the wood himself after it was dry-docked in Brownsville, Texas. Each piece varies in size, and maintains the profile of the original handrail.